Tuesday, January 26

Business

New York’s Real Climate Challenge: Fixing Its Aging Buildings
Business

New York’s Real Climate Challenge: Fixing Its Aging Buildings

A plan to upgrade a cluster of nine unremarkable apartment buildings in Brooklyn typically would not merit a second look. But this isn’t a quick fix; the project, called Casa Pasiva, aims to be a new model for the sustainable transformation of the city’s housing stock.Sleek new skyscrapers that incorporate the latest energy-efficient building materials like mass timber may look impressive, but when it comes to solving the climate crisis in New York, the real challenge lies in the city’s decades-old structures.More than 90 percent of the buildings in New York today will still be standing in 2050, and nearly 70 percent of the city’s total carbon emissions come from buildings. Taken together, these facts suggest that the fate of those nine nondescript Brooklyn buildings, and others like th
Retailing’s Tumultuous Year Began Before the Pandemic
Business

Retailing’s Tumultuous Year Began Before the Pandemic

The retail industry was in the midst of a transformation before 2020. But the onset of the pandemic accelerated that change, fundamentally reordering how and where people shop, and rippling across the broader economy.Many stores closed for good, as chains cut physical locations or filed for bankruptcy, displacing everyone from highly paid executives to hourly workers. Amazon grew even more powerful and unavoidable as millions of people bought goods online during lockdowns. The divide between essential businesses allowed to stay open and nonessential ones forced to close drove shoppers to big-box chains like Walmart, Target and Dick’s and worsened struggling department stores’ woes. The apparel industry and a slew of malls were battered as millions of Americans stayed home and a litany o
A Look at What’s in the Stimulus Package Trump Signed
Business

A Look at What’s in the Stimulus Package Trump Signed

WASHINGTON — The $900 billion stimulus bill that President Trump finally signed into law on Sunday evening goes well beyond providing the $600 checks that became a huge sticking point in getting the legislation across the finish line.The relief package casts a wide net with a variety of measures aimed at addressing the needs of millions of Americans, including those who have lost their jobs, as well as small businesses, nursing homes, colleges, universities and K-12 schools.The package extends some provisions of the original stimulus package that was passed in the spring, while adding new measures to help working families who have continued to suffer amid the pandemic.The full text of the bill ran almost 5,600 pages. Here’s a look at what’s included.Individual paymentsAmong the most ant
Did You Miss Out on Vacation This Year? You’re Not Alone
Business

Did You Miss Out on Vacation This Year? You’re Not Alone

In a typical year, New York employees of the magazine publisher Condé Nast must use their vacation days before late December or lose them — a common policy across corporate America.But early this month, the company sent employees an email saying they could carry up to five vacation days into next year, an apparent acknowledgment that many scrimped on days off amid the long hours and travel restrictions imposed by the pandemic. “The carry-over will be automatic, and there is nothing further you need to do,” the email said.Condé Nast was not alone in scrambling to make end-of-year arrangements for vacation-deprived workers. Some employers, however, have been less accommodating.“It’s a big issue we’re seeing now — competing requests for time off over the next two weeks,” said Allan S. Bloo
Kentucky Hurting While Awaiting Federal Pandemic Aid
Business

Kentucky Hurting While Awaiting Federal Pandemic Aid

In Perry County, Ky., the local government is cutting back on garbage pickup. Magoffin County is laying off public safety workers. And in Floyd County, where food pantries are reporting that demand has tripled over the past month, officials are trying to figure out how to avoid cuts to a program distributing food to families.“A lot of these kids, this is the only meal they get in a day,” said Robert Williams, Floyd County’s judge-executive, the chief elected official. “I can’t ask a kid to sit on a computer all day with nothing to eat.”In cases and deaths, Kentucky hasn’t been hit as hard by the coronavirus as some other states. Like most of the country, it has experienced a surge this fall, but one less severe than in neighboring Tennessee. Kentucky’s economy is reeling all the same, p
New York Post Editorial Blasts President’s Fraud Claims
Business

New York Post Editorial Blasts President’s Fraud Claims

“Give it up, Mr. President — for your sake and the nation’s.”In a blunt editorial, Rupert Murdoch’s New York Post, a tabloid that promoted Donald J. Trump long before he went into politics, told the president to end his attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.The Monday front page showed a downcast president and the all-caps headline “Stop the Insanity.” The publication’s website also highlighted the editorial, written by The Post’s editorial board, featuring it at the top of the home page.“Mr. President, it’s time to end this dark charade,” began the editorial.It blasted Mr. Trump’s suggestion that the House and Senate should try to disrupt the tallying of Electoral College votes on Jan. 6. It also ridiculed Sidney Powell, a former lawyer for the Trump campai
The Year Inequality Became Less Visible, and More Visible Than Ever
Business

The Year Inequality Became Less Visible, and More Visible Than Ever

This year, many Americans left the places where it was still possible to encounter one another. White-collar workers stopped going downtown, past homeless encampments and to lunch counters with minimum-wage staff. The well-off stopped riding public transit, where in some cities they once sat alongside commuting students and custodial workers. Diners stopped eating in restaurants, where their tips formed the wages of the people who served them.Americans also stopped broadly sharing libraries, movie theaters, train stations and public school classrooms, the spaces that still created common experience in increasingly unequal communities. Even the D.M.V., with its cross-section of life in a single room, wasn’t that anymore.Instead, people who could afford it retreated into smaller, more sec
The Gospel of Hydrogen Power
Business

The Gospel of Hydrogen Power

Bringing hydrogen vehicles into wide use on the East Coast strained even Mr. Strizki’s talent for invention. On the West Coast, Arnold Schwarzenegger, the former California governor, who owned a hydrogen Hummer, cleared regulatory barriers with a pen stroke in 2004. The East has a series of bureaucracies to navigate. For instance, hydrogen is not authorized to travel via bridges and tunnels. “We wouldn’t want to put out a vehicle that you couldn’t drive into Manhattan,” said Gil Castillo, who tracks regulations at Hyundai Motor North America.Further, Air Liquide, a gas manufacturer, quietly built five ready-to-go stations between Hempstead, N.Y., and Littleton, Mass., has to deal with state and city officials right down to the fire marshal, said David Edwards, director of the hydrogen t
What to Know of Covid-19 Antibody Drugs: Cost, Availability and More
Business

What to Know of Covid-19 Antibody Drugs: Cost, Availability and More

Two new antibody treatments have shown promise in keeping high-risk Covid-19 patients out of the hospital.But despite getting a publicity boost from President Trump, who received the Regeneron treatment in October and praised it as a “cure,” the drugs have not been widely used since being authorized for emergency use last month by the Food and Drug Administration.Now, federal and state health officials are urging patients and doctors to seek out the treatments.Here’s what you need to know.What are monoclonal antibodies?The two treatments, by Eli Lilly and Regeneron, are the first drugs developed specifically for Covid-19 to be authorized by the F.D.A. They consist of artificially synthesized copies of the antibodies that people produce naturally when their immune system fights off infec
As Bills Pile Up, Many Anxiously Keep Tabs on the Stimulus Bill
Business

As Bills Pile Up, Many Anxiously Keep Tabs on the Stimulus Bill

“It’s the worst thing I could possibly imagine,” she said. “If you told me a year ago that the entire country would be suffering the way it is now, with no help from the government, I would have told you that would never happen. We live in America.”More than 20 million Americans are collecting unemployment benefits and the unemployment rate stands at 6.7 percent. A year ago, before the pandemic hit, the jobless rate touched 3.5 percent, tying a 50-year low.For those living on the edge, the recent political gamesmanship has been infuriating.“We don’t have time for them to argue,” said Shannon Williams of Toledo, Ohio, who has lost two jobs to the pandemic. “Everybody needs help sometimes and right now, a lot of people need it.”The Second StimulusAnswers to Your Questions About the Stimul